Coming to Camp

Coming to Camp as a Parent

Even if you never went to camp as a kid OR even If you don’t think you are the campy kind of person, Camp Trillium can still offer you magical memories that will absolutely last a life-time! Camp is a chance for you and your family to relax, reconnect and rejuvenate. At camp your family has a chance to spend as much time together or take a break from the outside world as you each of you choose. Often parents over look coming to camp make the assumption that camp is for kids, this notion has changed. Parents get a chance to come out to camp during family camps. It is a chance to socialize with other parents without all the explanations of having a child with cancer, a chance to rest and relax, a chance to kick back and read a book, a chance to go crazy and challenge yourself with new activities and be a kid again!

At Camp Trillium we recognize that being a parent/caregiver of a child with cancer is unbelievably difficult and we want to offer you the benefits that can come from camp. When you participate in a camp program all the activities are optional, so you can jump in or just take some time for yourself. Special Friends or counselors are matched up with families to help maximize their camp experience. The Special Friends can help supervise your children, take them to the different activities, babysit them at night time or just check in on your family. Your time at camp is in your hands and can be enjoyed many different ways. So give your Camp Director a call with any questions or concerns at anytime, we want you to feel safe, excited and eager to see what all the commotion is about camp!

Sending your Kids to Camp

If you are sending you child(ren) to residential camp or other Trillium programs be assured that all Camp Trillium programs and facilities follow strict safety standards, including the accreditation standards of the Ontario Camps Association (OCA), and the guidelines from the Children’s Oncology Camping Association International (COCA-I). The safety of your children and your family is our number one priority. At camp your children are matched up with Special Friends too. There is a sheet at the back of the Health Form that we ask the campers and parents to fill out that helps us find the best match possible for your child(ren) so please take the time to provide us with as much insight as possible or call us.

How We Care for our Campers

What makes us different from other camps is that our programs are tailored to the unique needs of children with cancer, even if they are still on treatment. We strive to accommodate everyone who comes out to camp, regardless of ability. We encourage you to contact us if you have any specific questions or concerns.

Our Nursing Director is a pediatric oncology nurse, and supervises a team of nurses for all the overnight programs. As well, a pediatric oncologist is available on call in case of emergency. Each day, Camp Trillium has a nurse present at all times. Nurses are responsible for storing and dispensing campers’ medication, and taking care of any injuries or illnesses that may occur. If a camper requires cancer treatment while at camp, it can be arranged with the nearest clinic to the site.

Camp Traditions

Elbows on the table
Be sure not to get caught with both your elbows on the table during a meal because you will have to stand and sing a song for the whole dining hall!
No more Chemo cake
Presented to a camper or staff that has come off their chemotherapy treatments, it is something to celebrate!
Ahh Good Job
A cheer to celebrate something fun or worth cheering, it´s loud and the whole camp is usually involved.
Rub Dub Dub
What we say before we eat every meal: Rub Dub Dub, thanks for the grub, yah Kitchen!!!
Goodnight Song
The last song of the campfire just before the campers go off to bed.
Circle Song
The last song played at the dances. Everyone makes a circle and links arms.
Announcements
Be sure to never say this in front of a large group, try it and see what happens!
Hands Up
A song used to get the campers quiet and sitting: When the hand goes up, the mouth goes closed and the bum goes down.
Come Out
A song used to get kitchen staff out of the kitchen in order to thank them.
We Love You
A song sung on the final morning of camp to thank volunteers, nurses, kitchen staff and campers.
We are Table Number One
A song sung between tables at meals. Each table counts up a number.
There ain’t no…
Another popular dining hall song. Fill in the blanks with whatever kid-friendly rhyme you would like.

What to Bring to Camp

This is just a sample packing list. When you sign up for camp, you will receive a more detailed list, depending on which programs you will be attending.

Don’t Leave Home Without (per person):

Optional Items:

Do Not Bring:

Note: There is no internet access, and limited mobile phone reception for parents. Pay phones are available for parents at Family Camp. No mobile phones are permitted during Residential Camp.